ANTHROPOMETRIC INDICES – ARE THEY RISK FACTORS IN YOUNG MALE SUBJECTS WITH FAMILY HISTORY OF TYPE II DIABETES?

Mahesh Babu Tatineni, Deepika Vunnam

Abstract


India is undergoing a rapid epidemiological transition with increased urbanization and socioeconomic development leading to a dramatic change in lifestyle, consisting of physical inactivity, diet rich in fat, sugar and salt coupled with a high level of mental stress. This has led to increased incidence of lifestyle diseases like hypertension, type II Diabetes Mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity and ischemic heart diseases [1]. The risk of becoming diabetic for an individual with a positive family history of diabetes varies with the age of the proband when the diagnosis was made and the type of diabetes. Family history represents the integration of shared genomic and environmental risk factors. First degree relatives share half their genomic information and also behaviour, life styles, beliefs, culture and physical environment, so their disease experience may offer a clue to shared susceptibilities [2]. The risk of becoming a diabetic for an individual with a positive family history of diabetes increases by two- to fourfold an offspring’s chance and individuals with a positive family history of diabetes have higher body mass index (BMI) than controls [3] .Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the presence of a low BMI is more strongly familial than that at a higher BMI [4]. Thus family history could be used as a tool for genomic studies in order to understand the underlying shared gene-environment interrelation associated with complex traits in managing various diseases. Parental history of type 2 diabetes mellitus increases risk of not only glucose intolerance but also other cardio metabolic risk factors like overweight, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high blood pressure.[5] A positive family history was associated with increased risk of IFG/IGT (Impaired Fasting Glucose /Impaired Glucose Tolerance) and type2 DM as well as higher levels of obesity, HOMA-IR, fasting triglyceride (TG), and lower levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and HOMA-β [6].


Keywords


epidemiological, ANTHROPOMETRIC, TYPE II DIABETES

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