A COMPARISION BETWEEN RENAL CORTICAL THICKNESS AND RENAL SIZE AS AN INDICATOR OF RENAL FUNCTION IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE CASES, IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE, KING GEORGE HOSPITAL, VISAKHAPATNAM, AP,INDIA.

Kothuru Maneesha, Dr Y . Gnana Sundar Raju, Jangam Sukesh Kumar

Abstract


The prevalence of chronic kidney disease has increased worldwide
because of the growing numbers of cases of hypertension, diabetes,
obesity, in addition to aging of the general population Chronic kidney
disease is a worldwide public health problem, both for the number of
patients and cost of treatment involved. Globally, CKD is 12th cause of
death and 17th cause of disability, respectively. This is an underestimate
as patients with CKD are more likely to die of cardiovascular diseases
than to reach end stage renal disease (ESRD). Laboratory findings and
clinical symptoms are utilized in the diagnosis of CKD. Radiological
examination is an important tool for the differential diagnosis. Plain
abdominal radiography, intravenous pyelography, ultrasonography
(US), and computed tomography (CT) are commonly used methods.
US is a simple, cost-effective, and non-invasive method that is easy to
use for renal imaging(3). Length, volume, echogenicity, and cortical
thickness are important parameters in making an ultrasonographic
diagnosis. Length is feasible to measure, but is not necessarily
diagnostic, as it is not always measured using a standardized approach
and is related to body size . In previous studies, kidney volume was used
as a direct indicator of kidney size, rather than kidney length, but
evaluating renal volume is difficult and requires experience. Renal
cortical thickness (RCT) and echogenicity have also been used in the
diagnosis of CKD. With the progression of the disease, RCT decreases
and echogenicity increases. Laboratory assays play a supportive role
tracking the progression of the disease during follow-up, along with the
previously mentioned methods . However, echogenicity is mainly based
on the evaluation of a specialist, which in turn may yield subjective
results; moreover, no established standardized normal range values
currently exist for echogenicity, and a normal result for renal
echogenicity does not exclude the possibility that the patient's kidney is
damaged. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between
laboratory findings and ultrasonographic measurements of renal length
and cortical thickness in patients of CKD


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